Who was your elmer?

Perhaps with things so virtual anymore, elmers aren’t as important, but we here at the American Radio Club believe that everyone should have an elmer to help them in their journey to becoming a licensed amateur radio operator and upgrading, too. If you had an elmer who was instrumental in helping you become a ham, tell us about your elmer, who they were and what they did for you!

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If you’re an elmer, let us know. Perhaps others will look up to you in our community. :slight_smile:

My father should have been, but I didn’t get my license until years after he passed. I did, however, get his call sign :slight_smile:

I certainly could use an elmer, though.

Paul

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Thanks for sharing @Paul . That’s great that you were able to get his call sign. My elmer is one of the elmers here at American Radio Club… actually @ChuckARC and @JimARC both!

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Thanks dude! We need to get your antenna up before the leaves come in.

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@JimARC sounds like a plan to me!

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I had several different elmers. For instance early on NN4QQ was a big help to me with my VHF/UHF operations. He was really patient about answering my questions while we were on a morning commute over the repeater. I had N4EWT try and teach me morse code multiple time. That’s what is nice about this community, you can pick up a little something from everyone.

While not everyone loves Google, I always liked this for learning morse code, its not quite the same as doing it in the ham world, its super helpful for learning the basics.

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Oh that’s wonderful! Pre-Covid a group of us would go to local Maker Faires and related festivals and get kids playing with Morse Code. I still don’t think I can do enough to make a QSO but I love trying to decode it when I hear it in unique places. Thanks for sharing @K4VED